The problem-solving aspect of engineering appealed to me since I was young. I would tinker with Legos in attempts to create useful inventions to be used around the house. Legos and strings were combined to create an, albeit faulty, coffee pouring machine. This fascination with utility continued as I grew older. Medical devices appealed to me as useful devices; what greater utility could be found in a device than that of a pacemaker to a cardiac patient?

I took this inclination toward medical devices to Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering this past May. During my time completing my bachelors I was exposed to sustainability ideas such as device end-of-life, circularity; and became interested in medical device reprocessing. During my time at CWRU, I witnessed the benefits of reprocessing medical equipment while working on an NIH grant dedicated to studying medical device end-of-life. . .

Visit DotMed.com for the full article.